Skip to main content

I thought I'd try to separate what's known and what's not since the pattern of news for the last few days has been the following:

1) Europe/US evenings - latest rumours/breaking news
2) Asian evenings - those rumours denied
3) repeat daily

Until the aircraft is found, this will basically be pattern of news reporting. It is increasingly unreliable.

KNOWN

Flight 370 departed Kuala Lumpur at 41 minutes past midnight, local time. On board were 239 people including a group of calligraphers headed home to China, business people, at least two young men from Iran headed to Europe on stolen passports as asylum seekers, and others headed home, to other destinations, traveling.

From takeoff the flight quickly climbed to 35,000 feet. It is known that the plane's Rolls Royce engines sent two bursts of information to the manufacturer: once at takeoff and once during the ascent. Air Traffic Control began the process to hand the aircraft over to Vietnamese ATC. The pilot's last words to ATC were "alright, good night." The plane reached an international waypoint at 6°55′15″N 103°34′43″E and then, after turning a bit more to the northeast (from 28 degrees to 40 degrees), vanished at 1:21 am, local time.

Data from Flightradar24.com can be read here and here.

Primary radar seems to indicate a sudden descent and turn to the west. Subang ATC declared the aircraft missing at 2:40am local time, and Malaysian Airlines made its first statement just before 7:30am local time the same morning.

The Malaysians seem to have tracked a "UFO" (and by UFO, I'm not talking aliens, simply an object that was not and has not yet been conclusively identified) across the peninsula, descending to perhaps 29,500 feet (or just 3,000 feet according to some reports that don't entirely make sense given the high mountains on the peninsula) to a point above the Andaman Sea, headed northwest in the general direction of India at 2:40 am local time. And that's the last the object was seen.

There has been no conclusive trace of the aircraft since, despite a multi-day international search involving the assets of twelve different countries.

SPECULATION/UNVERIFIED
1. An oil rig worker at 8.38°N 108.7°E believes he spotted an object that he thinks could have been the plane high in the sky, burning close to the time the aircraft went missing over the Gulf of Thailand. The object, he believed, was in one piece, headed either away from or toward his location, some 50 to 70 kilometers from his location. He believed the burning object was lower than other aircraft, as he'd observed many aircraft at altitude before, and the oil rig is almost directly beneath a major air traffic corridor. After 15 seconds or so, the flames went out (either the fire went out, or the object passed over the horizon).

The email has been proven to be real. What the object was, we don't know yet.

2. A crowd-sourcing effort run by Tomnod may have spotted debris in the Gulf of Thailand. It's given me a new appreciation for how vast--and how filthy--the oceans are.  Tomnod's effort is, however, almost entirely concentrated near the last absolutely known point of the aircraft.

The objects that may have been spotted are here and here (the site is experiencing a heavy load. You may not get through.)

The first object appears to be a submerged airplane. However it is possible pareidolia is at play here. We want to find a 777, so we're going to see one.

The second object appears to be a large object, or a couple objects docked together. Here's a better link. To me, it looks like a couple ships. Again, pareidolia may be at play.

The first image has a LAT/LONG, the second does not. Most of Tomnod's imagry is along the flight path in the Gulf of Thailand, and search and recovery is still combing through there. I only offer these because they are interesting.

3. The aircraft's SATCOM systems may have continued pinging satellites for at least 5 hours after it went missing over the Gulf of Thailand, leading India and the US to send assets to the Andaman Sea according to the Wall Street Journal  who first broke the story. But the story seems to be moving into "unnamed officials said" territory.

And that's basically it. Most stories source back one way or another to the things that we know: the plane took off. Flight was normal until...it vanished from ATC. The flight may have been tracked across Malaysia and into the Andaman Sea. It may have flown for at least five more hours. The Malaysian government seems to be quite poor in the crisis management area. Beyond that, we know about as much as we did on March 8th.

This is another crowdsourcing map if anyone's interested, and here's another summary from the last few days.

EMAIL TO A FRIEND X
Your Email has been sent.
You must add at least one tag to this diary before publishing it.

Add keywords that describe this diary. Separate multiple keywords with commas.
Tagging tips - Search For Tags - Browse For Tags

?

More Tagging tips:

A tag is a way to search for this diary. If someone is searching for "Barack Obama," is this a diary they'd be trying to find?

Use a person's full name, without any title. Senator Obama may become President Obama, and Michelle Obama might run for office.

If your diary covers an election or elected official, use election tags, which are generally the state abbreviation followed by the office. CA-01 is the first district House seat. CA-Sen covers both senate races. NY-GOV covers the New York governor's race.

Tags do not compound: that is, "education reform" is a completely different tag from "education". A tag like "reform" alone is probably not meaningful.

Consider if one or more of these tags fits your diary: Civil Rights, Community, Congress, Culture, Economy, Education, Elections, Energy, Environment, Health Care, International, Labor, Law, Media, Meta, National Security, Science, Transportation, or White House. If your diary is specific to a state, consider adding the state (California, Texas, etc). Keep in mind, though, that there are many wonderful and important diaries that don't fit in any of these tags. Don't worry if yours doesn't.

You can add a private note to this diary when hotlisting it:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from your hotlist?
Are you sure you want to remove your recommendation? You can only recommend a diary once, so you will not be able to re-recommend it afterwards.
Rescue this diary, and add a note:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from Rescue?
Choose where to republish this diary. The diary will be added to the queue for that group. Publish it from the queue to make it appear.

You must be a member of a group to use this feature.

Add a quick update to your diary without changing the diary itself:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary?
(The diary will be removed from the site and returned to your drafts for further editing.)
(The diary will be removed.)
Are you sure you want to save these changes to the published diary?

Comment Preferences

  •  Aliens Hijacked It to N. Korea Through a Wormhole (6+ / 0-)

    Or maybe it was the Girl Scouts.

    How in the sheep-dipping hell does the NSA/CIA/USFS/USACOE consortium NOT know where this plane is?

    Strange women lying in ponds distributing swords is no basis for a system of government.

    by The Baculum King on Thu Mar 13, 2014 at 02:38:47 PM PDT

  •  Hi, The Tomnod guy from yestereday came back (3+ / 0-)

    a few hour later and said on his Twitter feed that he'd gotten a better view of what he found without cloud cover, and he doesn't think it's the plane.

    I'll go find you a link.

    Confession time: When I'm not ranting about politics, I write romance novels

    by teresahill on Thu Mar 13, 2014 at 02:41:36 PM PDT

    •  Here's his tweet: (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Louisiana 1976
      Mike Seberger ‏@MikeSeberger 3h

      @rodcraveiro - I've seen some subsequent (cloud-less) pics that tell me it's boats, and I don't want to distract from the "real" search.
      View conversation

      Confession time: When I'm not ranting about politics, I write romance novels

      by teresahill on Thu Mar 13, 2014 at 02:43:16 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  The most interesting thing I heard today (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Louisiana 1976, SuWho

      was that if the aircraft did fly on for 4 hours after turning  and heading west, then we have a pretty bizarre incident here. Since the aircraft was able to turn and the signals were able to be tracked, it means there was not necessarily any mechanical damage according to the experts.

      I have always thought it was mechanical. Still could be, but it's going to take a long long time before we have a definitive answer. If ever.

    •  i think the tomnod is useless. (0+ / 0-)

      any debris that would be from the plane would be too small to be seen from a satellite. at least the satellite that is being used.

      if the plane did break up the pieces that would be big enough to be seen would sink-not float and be visible

  •  they have gone back to prehistoric times (7+ / 0-)

    and are now seeing dinosaurs out the windows. They will have to go back to that cloud of turbulence to try to return to the present.

    Dear NSA: I am only joking.

    by Shahryar on Thu Mar 13, 2014 at 02:46:27 PM PDT

  •  Pluto had a long diary about what happened (9+ / 0-)

    two days ago, and a lot of different people with knowledge about planes and radar and engineering, etc., weighed in with a lot of good info., that I feared was getting lost in the long diary amidst people going on and on about cell phones ringing and conspiracy theories.

    So I pulled what I thought was the best new info. from there into another diary here.

    Sorry for the pimping, but if anybody wants to kick around possible scenarios of what happened or hear other people who seem to really know planes do that, it's there.

    Confession time: When I'm not ranting about politics, I write romance novels

    by teresahill on Thu Mar 13, 2014 at 02:47:30 PM PDT

  •  So, a question for this diary: (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Louisiana 1976

    Malaysian government?

    Incompetent?
    Horribly secretive by habit?
    Or both?

    Anybody know?

    Does no government in that region trust anyone else's government?

    Confession time: When I'm not ranting about politics, I write romance novels

    by teresahill on Thu Mar 13, 2014 at 02:49:08 PM PDT

  •  Anybody know about satellites? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Louisiana 1976

    Do they collect so much data that it would take days to search those in the area at that time and figure out if a satellite caught anything that might be helpful? Like those little pings from the engine, offering info. to the engine maker that the airline didn't subscribe to?

    Because it seems like you could go to the plane's last known coordinates and flip forward in time and watch the plane, but what do I know about satellites? Nothing.

    Confession time: When I'm not ranting about politics, I write romance novels

    by teresahill on Thu Mar 13, 2014 at 02:52:51 PM PDT

    •  I don't think satellites collect near that much (0+ / 0-)

      There might be satellite images of a particular area once every few days, or once a week, or even longer. Something could be in one spot an hour ago, and another spot now; and no satellite image would show any of it at all.

      “Texas is a so-called red state, but you’ve got 10 million Democrats here in Texas. And …, there are a whole lot of people here in Texas who need us, and who need us to fight for them.” President Obama

      by Catte Nappe on Thu Mar 13, 2014 at 03:00:44 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  So the unnamed sources saying the plane (0+ / 0-)

        pinged the satellite several times could be the plane following the path of the satellite? Or different satellites, I guess.

        Do you think the satellites collect so much it might take 5 days to find the info?

        Or I guess it could be that the info. is just coming out.

        Still, if they had it for five days, seems like they'd tell and try to get the search in the right place.

        Confession time: When I'm not ranting about politics, I write romance novels

        by teresahill on Thu Mar 13, 2014 at 03:08:43 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  The biggest issue (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Villanova Rhodes

      is that satellites don't hover over a particular location. The are in orbit over the earth (typically polar or near-polar), so they "sweep" an image path over the surface of the earth. This is great if you're looking at things that don't move very fast, but it would be pure luck if a satellite happened to be imaging a particular spot as the plane passed through it.

      Also, the plane was (I believe) lost at night, so visible light cameras would have been useless. Now, if there happened to be a satellite with an infrared camera I image a jet would leave a pretty good IR signature, but all the imagery I've seen has been visible.

  •  Also, people in the other diaries said it was (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Wreck Smurfy, NancyK, SuWho, ColoTim

    hard to come up with a scenario in which damage to the aircraft took out all communications systems and all transponders, but still left the aircraft in a condition to stay in the air.

    Because there are multiple communications systems and multiple transponders, so there'd have to be a lot of damage to the plane.

    Even if it lost all electrical power, that plane is equipped to produce its own electricity, a small amount to run critical functions, like communications and transponders. It has little turbines that stick up and air rushes past them, and they produce electricity. Cool, huh?

    So to disable all that by damage to the plane or equipment failure, it seems like the plane would be so compromised, it wouldn't have been able to keep flying.

    What does that leave? Hi-jacking? A struggle with a hijacker that took it down after it turned off communications and transponders, so it's in completely different place than anyone's looking?

    Pilot suicide doesn't seem to fit. Well, I guess unless he really didn't want the wreckage to be found. Otherwise, why turn off the transponder and com? You just take the plane into a dive and hit the water. It's over. Would he commit suicide and want all those people's bodies to never be found? Maybe to leave some question about whether it was actually suicide? Would a suicidal person be thinking that carefully? Saving face? Would that be a big thing?

    If the plane stayed in the air that long, and the pilot could steer, he could have gotten back to the airport he'd just left. He could have tried to land, unless someone was forcing him not to.

    I keep trying to find some scenario that makes sense, and nothing seems to.

    Confession time: When I'm not ranting about politics, I write romance novels

    by teresahill on Thu Mar 13, 2014 at 03:05:38 PM PDT

    •  I'm coming around to your thinking as well (0+ / 0-)

      If the plane could turn around and fly for hours, then it should have had the capability to communicate somehow.

    •  i've been treating the news of the west (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      T100R, saralee, Hastur

      turn as speculative since we don't seem to really know. when stories start quoting "unnamed officials" I tend to both glaze over and get really nitpicky at the same time.

      Dawkins is to atheism as Rand is to personal responsibility. uid 52583 lol

      by terrypinder on Thu Mar 13, 2014 at 03:13:32 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I find it hard to believe no-one made a phone call (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Just Some Guy, Hastur

      If the plane flew for 4 more hours over Malaysia or anywhere else in SE Asia. The odds are that there were at least 200 cell phones on the plane, and during that time NOBODY called home? Or texted? That's the thing that makes me believe the plane went right down.

      "When does the greed stop, we ask the other side? That's the question and that's the issue." - Senator Ted Kennedy

      by Fordmandalay on Thu Mar 13, 2014 at 03:34:58 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  In the suspense movie (0+ / 0-)

        the Ocean's 11 gang running this put a box on board that mimicked a cell tower. When people tried to dial out their phones were suckered into relying on the phony tower, which never connected them.

      •  Cell phones don't work (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        eyesoars

        over the middle of the ocean.  I'm baffled why so many people seem to think that they do.  Based on the latest speculation they'd have had at most a handful of minutes' window, while crossing Malaysia, to do it, and that's assuming the passengers were both aware of the situation at that time and also capable of making a phone call.

      •  And obviously, if someone could have made a phone (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        EJP in Maine

        call and they had a signal, they would have made a phone call already. No one did, so I'd have to believe either no one's alive to do it or none of the phones survived or they're alive in a place where there's no cell service.

        Confession time: When I'm not ranting about politics, I write romance novels

        by teresahill on Thu Mar 13, 2014 at 05:11:05 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  AN UNGODLY SCENE (0+ / 0-)

    The aircraft carried on after the catastrophic incident for a while.  Ultimately they lost any remnant of electrical or electronic control of the airframe..
    This is similar to the 747 JAL flight that crashed in Japan after the rear hydraulic controls were destroyed.
    The pilots used the engines to manage pitch and roll for some time but  eventually crashed into a mountain. Around 300 to 400 people perished in the crash....
    I would like to believe that the passengers were killed in  the casuative incident but I believe most of the passengers were alive and concious it that final, horrific time before the final crash.

    "AMERICA DID NOT INVENT HUMAN RIGHTS, HUMAN RIGHTS INVENTED AMERICA"

    by michealallison on Thu Mar 13, 2014 at 03:10:46 PM PDT

    •  So they had very limited control and could (0+ / 0-)

      keep it in the air but not do anything like steer it toward a runway or even land. Yeah, I'd say that's possible.

      Original stories said that plane is capable of staying in the air -- gliding without engines running -- for an hour. But I'd think that would have to be without structural damage, just engines out.

      Confession time: When I'm not ranting about politics, I write romance novels

      by teresahill on Thu Mar 13, 2014 at 03:16:24 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  No... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Villanova Rhodes

        W/o any engines running, the aircraft is coming down at a thousand feet per minute or more. It can glide a long ways from 35,000' -- almost certainly over 100 miles -- but it's coming down, and will be down in 30 minutes at most.

        If the engines are out, then they also need to deploy the RAT (ram air turbine) to get electricity to run their systems, and they'll need to keep extra speed (and descent rate) to keep control of the aircraft.

        If they've got one or more engines running, then they can stay up a long time. The higher they stay, the farther they can go. Jet engines are fuel pigs at low altitude.

    •  523 in the end (0+ / 0-)

      hundreds survived and died because of a variety of reasons (SDF would not let the Americans send rescuers to the crash site was a big one)

      Dawkins is to atheism as Rand is to personal responsibility. uid 52583 lol

      by terrypinder on Thu Mar 13, 2014 at 03:17:18 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  At what point is the US or China gonna accept (0+ / 0-)

    that the Malaysians are either totally incompetent or dicking them around.  They just sent the US navy out to search in the Indian Ocean.  

    •  it's Malaysia's show regardless (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Hillbilly Dem

      it was their plane, the aircraft went missing in their airspace. the US and China are there by invitation. It's Malaysia who asked the US to search the Andaman Sea. We didn't decide to do that on our own.

      Dawkins is to atheism as Rand is to personal responsibility. uid 52583 lol

      by terrypinder on Thu Mar 13, 2014 at 03:18:30 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Someone in Pluto's diary said China's building (0+ / 0-)

      the most advances planes of anyone right now, so China knows all the information coming back from that plane and all the safety features. And that they have to be really pissed.

      There was also a story that said China put 10 of its own satellites onto the job of searching the area for the plane.

      Confession time: When I'm not ranting about politics, I write romance novels

      by teresahill on Thu Mar 13, 2014 at 03:21:38 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I Think That Indian Ocean Cruise (0+ / 0-)

      Was our idea. Or based on our information. Or somebody had a dream at Langley.

      Strange women lying in ponds distributing swords is no basis for a system of government.

      by The Baculum King on Thu Mar 13, 2014 at 04:06:31 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Request of Malaysia, (0+ / 0-)

        or at least that is a report.

        Pentagon officials said that the destroyer USS Kidd was being moved to the western part of the strait of Malacca at the request of Malaysia and is heading towards an area where the Indian Ocean and the Andaman Sea meet. The ship has helicopters aboard that can scour the area.
        ABC
        •  That doesn't mean the info (0+ / 0-)

          came from Malaysia.  In fact given all the Pentagon sources and so on being quoted today I'd be really surprised if it did.

          Likely this is just do to Malaysia having formal lead of the investigation.  They have to give the orders.

          •  Based on the new radar data today, it does (0+ / 0-)

            look like they were headed for Sultan Iskandar Airport on the northern tip of Sumatra in Banda Aceh which has a landing strip that would accommodate that large plane.  I am not surprised that they changed course and headed back out to sea because landing it with no daylight would be too dangerous.

            I would think that if the plane was hijacked by terrorists, they would need help on the ground to hide such a large plane and move the people into a remote location.  It would not be the first time that a large group of foreigners were kidnapped for money.  

  •  there was no flight 370 (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    hulibow, Villanova Rhodes, SuWho, Hastur, Debby

    it's all a media concoction to keep us distracted from whatever it was that was distracting us last week.

    The cold passion for truth hunts in no pack. -Robinson Jeffers

    by Laurence Lewis on Thu Mar 13, 2014 at 03:15:37 PM PDT

  •  HOW could MH 370 fly with all electronics gone? (0+ / 0-)

    The Boeing 777 has some redundancy for emergency power.  
    Batteries can provide some limited power for a limited time. There is also a small jet trubine that can be lowered from the fuselage which could provided some electrical power.  

    Also, pilots can use the engine thrust to assist with pitch and roll this keeps the plane flying but cannot be used to change direction or altitude..

    Maybe if the casutive incident happened soon after takoff these redunancies woul have allowed the aircraft to return home.

    Sadly, they were hundreds of miles over the sea and airport to far away.  
    They were headed to an airport but just could not reach home.

    "AMERICA DID NOT INVENT HUMAN RIGHTS, HUMAN RIGHTS INVENTED AMERICA"

    by michealallison on Thu Mar 13, 2014 at 03:23:08 PM PDT

  •  One word (0+ / 0-)

    Cracks.

    Few more words.

    Cracks 40 cm long were found under a satellite antenna input that could lead to to catastrophic fuselage failure.  This 777 not inspected as it did not (according to records) have such a system (how does the engine data get to Rolls Royce then?) but we know from the Egypt Air plane's cockpit deviated from the blueprints and with a number of others.  

    Cracks have also been found in Wings supplied by Mitsubishi.

    (sorry cannot paste link as having to use cellphone but Google "Boeing 777 cracking advisory)

    "Come to Sochi, visit the gay clubs and play with the bears" - NOT a Russian advertising slogan.

    by Lib Dem FoP on Thu Mar 13, 2014 at 03:36:25 PM PDT

    •  that AD didn't apply to this particular aircraft (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      NancyK

      i mean the aircraft itself, not the entire family.

      source, here

      Dawkins is to atheism as Rand is to personal responsibility. uid 52583 lol

      by terrypinder on Thu Mar 13, 2014 at 03:44:42 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Or did it (0+ / 0-)

        The FAA and Boeing used the delivery records to find out which planes had that antenna fitting.  The Egypt Air fire proves that Boeing 777s were not being built and inspected properly. Brackets for the wiring were missing and long loops of wire were dangling. The complete cause of that fire was never explained but changes made really on speculation.  

        Only a very full inspection of the planes made immediately before and after this aircraft would see if indeed quality control failed.  I am starting to wonder if they have problems with ensuring subcontractors are up to standard - clearly Mitsubishi have been having trouble with the wings. I believe the 777s like Airbus are built as large sections with final assembly at the main plant. The difference appears to be that Boeing are using other companies rather than plants in the same company.

        "Come to Sochi, visit the gay clubs and play with the bears" - NOT a Russian advertising slogan.

        by Lib Dem FoP on Thu Mar 13, 2014 at 04:00:25 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Wouldn't it have come apart and exploded? (0+ / 0-)

      Because US intelligence sources said early on they looked at their satellite coverage for the area -- which they said is really good -- at that time and saw no explosion.

      But the plane was only an hour into a six hour flight. It would have had a lot of fuel on board.

      It couldn't crack into pieces and not explode, could it?

      Confession time: When I'm not ranting about politics, I write romance novels

      by teresahill on Thu Mar 13, 2014 at 04:00:11 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  It could (0+ / 0-)

        Aviation fuel is comparativel imflammable. Main tanks are in the wings. The satellite surveylence only looked for bright flashes and was intended as a nuclear test detection system. Doubts have been expressed whether anything other than a direct hit by a SAM would be seen.

        "Come to Sochi, visit the gay clubs and play with the bears" - NOT a Russian advertising slogan.

        by Lib Dem FoP on Thu Mar 13, 2014 at 04:05:39 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I did think it was really odd that anyone in US (0+ / 0-)

          intelligence would come out right away and volunteer the info. that we looked at our massive amount of satellite images in that area at that time, and we found no explosion.

          Seemed like them being overly open or overly helpful, which is not what I think of when I think US intelligence.

          Confession time: When I'm not ranting about politics, I write romance novels

          by teresahill on Thu Mar 13, 2014 at 05:14:59 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  shot down by pootie-Putin (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Hastur

    so as to take Crimea off the pages of Dkos

    worked too

    We're shocked by a naked nipple, but not by naked aggression.

    by Lepanto on Thu Mar 13, 2014 at 03:52:22 PM PDT

  •  This report from ABC indicates (7+ / 0-)

    two communication systems on aircraft were shut down separately, indicating that the plane didn't crash due to catastrophic failure.

    http://abcnews.go.com/...

    •  Oh, that's new. From the link above: (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      SuWho, ColoTim, Sharon Wraight
      The data reporting system, they believe, was shut down at 1:07 a.m. The transponder -- which transmits location and altitude -- shut down at 1:21 a.m.

      This indicates it may well have been a deliberate act, ABC News aviation consultant John Nance said.

      U.S. investigators told ABC News that the two modes of communication were "systematically shut down."

      That means the U.S. team "is convinced that there was manual intervention," a source said, which means it was likely not an accident or catastrophic malfunction that took the plane out of the sky.

      Confession time: When I'm not ranting about politics, I write romance novels

      by teresahill on Thu Mar 13, 2014 at 05:37:56 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  i'm bothered by the use of "sources" (3+ / 0-)

        WHO said it and WHY.

        Dawkins is to atheism as Rand is to personal responsibility. uid 52583 lol

        by terrypinder on Thu Mar 13, 2014 at 05:45:28 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  They said the same thing about SilkAir . (0+ / 0-)

          Then they claimed that the pilot crashed the plane .
          Why shut off the transponder if you are going to crash the plane ? The transponder being on doesn't stop the plane from crashing . Shutting off the radios doesn't keep the plane flying .

          "please love deeply...openly and genuinely." A. M. H.

          by indycam on Thu Mar 13, 2014 at 06:44:15 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  thought that pilot shut everything off (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Sharon Wraight

            transponder, FDR, CVR, then plunged the plane into a river.

            Dawkins is to atheism as Rand is to personal responsibility. uid 52583 lol

            by terrypinder on Thu Mar 13, 2014 at 06:46:33 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Do you know that Parker Hannifin (0+ / 0-)

              paid out after being sued in a U.S. court ?
              Do you know that after that the Parker Hannifin made part was replaced on all the fleet with a part of another design ?

              Do you know that the plane snapped onto its back before its rapid descent into the river ?

              Do you know that two other planes of the same type snapped onto their backs before auguring in ?

              Can you give any good reason for shutting anything off before plunging the plane into a river ?

              "please love deeply...openly and genuinely." A. M. H.

              by indycam on Thu Mar 13, 2014 at 06:56:51 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  i know all of that (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Sharon Wraight

                and cant answer your question. I don't know. Having been suicidal once and having made an attempt, I can tell you I did some irrational things that made no sense later after I was hospitalized and medicated and could think clearly.

                for what its worth while I fly rarely, i prefer not to fly on that type of airplane. it means i have to avoid using a certain US airline that uses them exclusively, but again, I fly rarely. call me silly and superstitious.

                Dawkins is to atheism as Rand is to personal responsibility. uid 52583 lol

                by terrypinder on Thu Mar 13, 2014 at 07:18:56 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  Do you know that the black box on the (0+ / 0-)

                  SilkAir had real problems before the crash ?

                  If its the case or idea that a suicidal pilot switched off the equipment before before flipping the aircraft onto its back on the way to the river because suicidal people do irrational things , why would another suicidal person do the same same ? Wouldn't the irrational acts be more random ?

                  "please love deeply...openly and genuinely." A. M. H.

                  by indycam on Thu Mar 13, 2014 at 07:29:54 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

          •  I believe the SilkAir pilot... (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            notrouble, terrypinder

            ...was suspected of trying to have his family collect on a life insurance policy. Turning of the transponder and CVR and FDR makes it hard for investigators to prove that the crash was intentional. I believe in the SilkAir case there was never a formal finding the the pilot intentionally crashed, although it was suspected.

            "Great is the power of steady misrepresentation; but the history of science shows that fortunately this power does not long endure."--Charles Darwin

            by Hopeful Monster on Thu Mar 13, 2014 at 07:52:53 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

  •  Andaman Sea. (0+ / 0-)

    More islands in that neighborhood. Andaman and Icobar Islands, and various Pulau islands.

  •  As a suggestion (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    terrypinder, notrouble

    Next time instead of linking directly to the Tomnod website which is being thoroughly hammered, I suggest that you take a screenshot and post to imgur, a more reliable and permanent method of dealing with images from that site.

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site